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JavaScript Weekly Issue 65
February 10, 2012
Welcome to issue 65 of JavaScript Weekly. No news from my end this week so let's get straight to the links!
Headlines
Nodebits - A New Node.js Focused Blog Nodebits is a site 'dedicated to keeping the NodeJS spirit of innovation and creativity alive.' Bold for 4 posts old but it's a good start!
Remy Sharp's New Node and HTML5 Course (in the UK) If you're a British JS developer, you've probably heard of Remy Sharp, and he's got a new 'Node and HTML5 for a real-time web' course taking place in March down in Brighton. No bribes involved here, Remy's just a cool guy :-)
EnvJasmine 1.7 Released (Headless JS Testing Tool)
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Articles
Easily Test jQuery Pre-Release Versions Dan Heberden shows off a handy way of testing pre-release versions of jQuery on your existing apps and pages without manually replacing code each time.
Is JavaScript 'Untyped' or Not? Yes and No.. I was enjoying a slidedeck by David Mandelin the other day and he said that 'JavaScript is untyped'. I asked Brendan Eich about this assertion and he made a comment that encouraged me to ask the folks at Stack Overflow to explain the terminology to me. Turns out, JavaScript is untyped and typed at the same time. Learn more about this quirk of semantics here.
Slicing Arguments David DeSandro looks at the art of slicing JavaScript's arguments variable, how it's used in an intriguing pattern for plugin methods, and how he used it to good effect. Nice live JSFiddle demo of the outcome too.
Regular Expressions in CoffeeScript are Awesome Like me, Elijah Manor enjoys a good regular expression and here he shows off formatting a regex over multiple lines in CoffeeScript.
Differences Between jQuery .bind() vs .live() vs .delegate() vs .on()
Modernizr Prefixed: Annoying DOM Style Prefixes Be Gone The browser prefix hell that exists in CSS exists in the JS-accessible DOM too. Modernizr's 'prefixed' method returns the right property name to use for the current browser, resulting in tidier JavaScript style manipulation. Andi Smith shows us how.
Notes on Sam Stephenson's CoffeeScript Video Last week I linked to a video of 37signals' Sam Stephenson talking about CoffeeScript. But if you're not into watching videos, David Cochran has done a great job of making notes of all the pertinent parts. Why does Sam dig CS so much? Find out here.
'If You're Using Node.js, You're Doing Life Wrong' If you hate controversy, steer clear of this, but it did well on Hacker News so just this once.. ;-) The Code Slinger isn't a fan of Node.js and in this post he explains why.
EasyXDM: Crossdomain JavaScript Done Right
Video and Audio
Anders Janmyr on Functional JavaScript At November's Oredev conference, Anders Janmyr spoke about the functional side of JavaScript, including its first class functions and higher order functions you can implement. The video of his talk is now available.
JavaScript Jabber on Build Tools In a 45 minute episode, the JavaScript Jabber panel takes on the topic of JavaScript build tools from module systems like AMD to package managers like npm and asset packagers like Sprockets.
Derick Bailey on Backbone.js Derick Bailey, known for his Backbone.js screencasts, spoke to the guys at the fine Herding Code podcast about Backbone.js, what it is (and, critically, what it isn't), and what it's useful for. Lots of handy info here.
Code and Libraries
TypedJS: Add (and Test Against) Type Annotations to your JS Code TypedJS aims to be a sanity check for your JavaScript code by harnessing the power of type annotations to make your code more robust. It seems to fuzz test your functions based on expected input and output types (that you specify).
Serenade.js: Yet Another MVC Client-side JavaScript Framework Sweden's Elabs presents another take on the MVC client side framework believing that Serenade 'more closely follows the ideas of classical MVC' amongst other things.
Why Serenade.js? If you weren't convinced by the previous link, Jonas Nicklas of Elabs took some time to specifically explain why Serenade.js is an option worth considering in the JavaScript MVC scene. Addy Osmani gave them a thumbs up for researching and understanding the original Smalltalk-80 description of MVC.
Wrap.js: RequireJS Plugin for Wrapping Regular Scripts as AMD Modules Not every library has direct support for AMD but Dave Geddes' wrap.js plugin handles the nested require based on a config and generates an actual AMD module for you. Now you don't have to write wrappers around scripts that you wish were modules, wrap.js does it instead.
tty.js: A Terminal in Your Browser (using Node, Express + Socket.io)
File-Watcher: Watch Multiple Files for Changes (over HTTP) Part of a set of two libraries to watch all of the URLs of resources used on a page and then reload them if they change at all (ideal for front-end developers).
jQuery.superLabels: A Slick Placeholder Text Effect on Form Inputs
Noty: A jQuery Notification Plugin The latest in a long line of jQuery popup notification plugins but this one is particularly flexible and well done.
SimpleVid: A jQuery Plugin for Self-Hosted Fluid Width Video SimpleVid provides an easy way to host and embed your own fluid (in the resizable sense) videos. Think of it like a FitVids.js but for self hosted video. Handy. It even has a Flash fallback for browsers that don't support H.264.
Touchy.js: A Lightweight JS Library for Touch Events Touchy.js by Jairaj Sethi is a simple, lightweight (just over 1KB when compressed) library for dealing with touch events in the browser. It has no dependencies so you can get started right away.
Textualizer: Text Blurb Transitions Textualizer bills itself as a jQuery plugin that lets you 'transition through blurbs of text' using various effects.
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